JOHNSTONS OF ELGIN

Alexander Johnston established Johnstons in 1797 in the same location as it stands today. Initially the mill was concerned with linen, flax, oatmeal and tobacco. Innovative and forward thinking, Johnston gradually introduced textiles and phased out all other products. Johnstons pioneered tweed for camouflage eventually creating what have come to be known as Scottish Estate Tweeds.

Then came the testing of exotic fibres from around the world - cashmere, guanaco, vicuna, camel, mink and yak for fabric and throws. In the early years, the company struggled its way through many failed ventures but a dogged determination paid off. (Scots know a little about such things.)

Today the firm bearing his name, Johnstons, is known throughout the world for their luxurious treatment of both fibre and colour and nowhere is this more apparent than in this collection of throws.

The desire and inspiration was to create a lap rug that was evocative of Scotland bound together as a nation. A consensus of sources established 32 political districts (counties) in Scotland. To ensure the scale and independence of each Saltire fine blue and white lines were inserted and the selvage edges are composed of the ubiquitous checkerboards found on Scotland's police caps. Many thanks to the patient design team at Johnstons of Elgin whose collaborative effort resulted in the creation of Thistle & Broom's exclusive St. Andrew's Cross, adapted.
St. Andrew's Cross, adapted
The desire and inspiration was to create a lap rug that was evocative of Scotland bound together as a nation. A consensus of sources established 32 political districts (counties) in Scotland. To ensure the scale and independence of each Saltire fine blue and white lines were inserted and the selvage edges are composed of the ubiquitous checkerboards found on Scotland's police caps. Many thanks to the patient design team at Johnstons of Elgin whose collaborative effort resulted in the creation of Thistle & Broom's exclusive St. Andrew's Cross, adapted.
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